Publisher

"Eustice Watkins"

"Watkins & Kracke Ltd"

 

51 Beech Street, London E.C.

 

Eustace Watkins began to publish post  cards in about 1908, and by 1909 he had joined up with Max Krake to publish cards under the name "Watkins and Kracke Ltd." However it appear that the partnership broke up in 1910. Artists employed included Frederick Spurgin. This short-lived company is best known for The Infantastic Series."

 

No 3

Go Away Mousie Do!

Posted 8 November 1909

The Infantastic Series

No 23

The Rising Generation -

- The Territorals

The Infantastic Series   Copyright

Published by Watkins and Kracke, Ltd., 51/52 Beech Street, London E.C.

No 5

Between Two Fires

No 8

The Only Way

No 12

"Whisper & I Shall Hear"

No 16

She's Black, but Comely

No 26

The Shades of the Palm

Other Comic Sets Published

 

Jock: Don't look down or you will fall,

Lady: Where shall I look then?

No Signature

Published by Watkins and Kracke, Ltd., 51/52 Beech Street, London E.C.

Burlesque Series No 114  Copyright

 

 

Keep on doing it sandy

No Signature

No Pubisher

51/52 Beech Street, London E.C.

Burlesque Series No 325 

Copyright

 

My word, if I catch you bending.

Burlesque Series No 57

No Signature  No publisher

Printed in Saxony

 

Are you sure no one is looking

Burlesque Series No 67

No Signature  No publisher

Printed in Saxony

 

I wish they'd do it now!

Signed Dauber

The Satire Series No36 Copyright Printed in England

Published at 51 and 51 Beech Street, London

 

A Sadder and a wiser man,

He rose he morrow morn.

The Ancient Mariner

Signed Dauber

The Satire Series No21 Copyright Printed in England

Published at 51 and 51 Beech Street, London

 

No Ma - I'm not climbing after the jam. I've fell off the stool

No Signature

The Creative Series  No 15 Copyright

Published by Watkins and Kracke, Barbican, London, E C

 

 

 

 

Biographical Note

Max Krake (1879-1948) was born in Germany, and probably came to England after 1901 as he cannot be located in the census of that year. In 1908 (and 1910) he was listed at 51 Beech Street, Barbican, E C, as a fine art printer and according to Bryatt had previously been with the firm of merchants Levy and Krake Ltd. For a short time in 1909/10 he was publishing post cards as part of Watkins & Krake Ltd. In the 1911 census he is described as a merchant in fancy good, and was living in a boarding house in Hampstead.  By 1913 his business had moved to Finsbury court and he is subsequently described as a fine art printer (1913), a manufacturing agent (1915) and a fancy goods importer (1925). He was also described as a toy merchant n 1925, when a fireman was killed fighting a fire in his basement warehouse, in 2 Finsbury Street, London. As a German citizen it is not known what happened to him during the First World War but he did no apply for British citizenship until 1932, while living at 13 Lutterell Avenue, Putney, S W 15, where he was still living when he died in 1948.